No Secrets. Just Cycle.

Rob Stanley

Cyclist.

Delamere Forest. 

New Wheels

New Wheels

Artic Bike. 

Artic Bike. 

Official photo’s from London to Paris 24. 

joinakibbutz:

for those of you not watching the TdF, the tractors were all moving.

joinakibbutz:

for those of you not watching the TdF, the tractors were all moving.

Me and Dave (posing) after setting off 24 hours earlier in London sat in Paris celebrating with the rest of the peloton. 

Me and Dave (posing) after setting off 24 hours earlier in London sat in Paris celebrating with the rest of the peloton. 

Set the Bianchi up ready for London to Paris 24. 
Looks like it is set up for winter with the lights.
Before anyone starts asking questions, the bell is there to satisfy French authorities who insist that bicycles must have bells and in light of Alberto Contador’s recent running with the French men in blue for not having lights when cycling through tunnels, I figured it is probably best to keep them happy. And the reason for it being in such a stupid place is that it would not fit on my handle bars (evidently road bikes were not designed with bell’s in mind) so I thought I was being quite innovative by attaching it to the light bracket. 
I am also not a huge fan of riding with 2 bottles on the frame, if I need 2 I usually put one in the back pocket of my jersey but given we are cycling 287 miles in 24 hours, I figured I should probably mount as much weight as I can onto the bike as opposed to my back. 

Set the Bianchi up ready for London to Paris 24. 

Looks like it is set up for winter with the lights.

Before anyone starts asking questions, the bell is there to satisfy French authorities who insist that bicycles must have bells and in light of Alberto Contador’s recent running with the French men in blue for not having lights when cycling through tunnels, I figured it is probably best to keep them happy. And the reason for it being in such a stupid place is that it would not fit on my handle bars (evidently road bikes were not designed with bell’s in mind) so I thought I was being quite innovative by attaching it to the light bracket. 

I am also not a huge fan of riding with 2 bottles on the frame, if I need 2 I usually put one in the back pocket of my jersey but given we are cycling 287 miles in 24 hours, I figured I should probably mount as much weight as I can onto the bike as opposed to my back. 

Added a Biography to my blog.

20

York, UK

Road, Track

I live, eat and breath cycling.

I love to race although this is my first proper season. I am accredited on the track and hope to start racing in Manchester in the Winter. I am a regular out training on the roads and also participate in sportives and regional races. I hope I am able to progress and move up categories both on the road and track and continue participating the sport I love until the day I die. 

Cycling as a sport is able to produce tremendous athletes who arguably participate in some of the hardest sporting competitions in the world. Being able to watch such fantastic athletes drive themselves beyond their limits evokes such desire within me to do the same. Although I will probably never win the Tour de France, or even compete in it, I still want to race and drive myself to be the best I possibly can be. Not to beat anyone else, but to carry on proving to myself what I am capable of. If I can win races, I can do anything. 

The cycling community has captured my imagination, the almost family like camaraderie of cyclists creates a warm and inviting social network in which we are all able to share our common passion. Cycling appears to be just one man and his bike but by immersing yourself in cycling, you soon come to realise that you are surrounded by hundreds of fantastic people from many walks of life. This explosion of characters within the community goes some way to explaining how us cyclists manage to get out of bed before the sun has come up to go out and fight through cold, wet, punishing head winds.

Although fundamentally simple machines, the complex engineering and design work that goes into the production of bicycles fascinates me. I like to read about the engineering of different bikes and also have ambitions to design and build my own. 

Cycling has remained a consistent part of my life for as long as I can remember. Admittedly it has changed forms, from cycling up and down the bumpy pavement of my street as a child to weekly visits to the skate park on my BMX through my teenage years. I now find myself indulged in a remarkable passion that lends itself so kindly to all aspects of life. Only on a bicycle is one able to feel such a range of emotions, have so much time to think, socialise, evoke such ambition and drive. I could tell you what cycling means to me but realistically, that changes every time I get in the saddle. It is the ability to be whatever you want it to be without constraint that makes cycling my passion. 

Life is a journey, a bicycle is my vehicle.